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Returning to Social Media, Sharing my thoughts

Many friends have asked me about my absence from social media (principally Facebook, Blog, Twitter) for some time. I had expected to return to it after my last post some time in January (after absence of more than two months) but somehow that did not happen.

I had assumed that all my contacts knew that I was visiting Bharat but apparently that is not the case. I have people telling me- “Oh, we didn’t know you were in Bharat. When did you come? When are you going back?” So I should let all know that I have been in Bharat since mid December and will be here till late April.

Unlike in the past, this time my travel is limited as the objective of this visit is different. This time my wife and I have decided to spend quality time with my mother who is 91 years old , in her own home. Here in Karnavati (i.e., Amdavad). As such she stays in USA with us brothers but obviously she loves to be here in the house where she has spent decades and has many sweet memories. Naturally, we couldn’t be traveling around leaving her alone at home, so our outings are limited to a few hours in and around Karnavati.

This is first time that we are spending extended time in Bharat and I had to learn a lot about how to get the house going- be it reconnection of phone line, gas line, finding a cooking lady, finding servant, getting Internet connection, doing all grocery shoppng, etc. It has been fun as well as a challenge.

In the new environment, I find that my attraction (or is it addiction?) to computer has lessened considerably. I do check my emails regularly and at times visit Facebook briefly but have not ventured to write blogs.

I am enjoying watching early morning stars, long morning walks (1.5 to 3 miles), sipping warm milk while reading Indian Express leisurely on the swing (Jhoola) in our compound , sweeping fallen leaves from trees, watching some TV, afternoon naps, sitting with my mother reminiscing of days gone by, reading whatever I fancy

(I am reading simultaneously Mahabharat’s Shanti Parva , Dilip Kumar’s autography and an engineering book) and doing a host of myriad other things, including finding a right contractor to repair our house.

It is strange that I have not remembered for a moment in this time my house in Edison, NJ where I have lived for 15 years.

There s a lot to write about and God willing I will have multiple blogs in near future.

These are the subjects floating in my mind:

  • Township developed for followers of a particular Sampradaya
  • Visit of villages with a doctor
  • Jamnagar, and swachcha Bharat
  • Rajkot, Visiting an Old Age Home
  • Yeh Bambai Meri Jaan
  • GIBV conference on Make in India
  • Vibrant Gujarat?
  • What a determined young lady could achieve- Innovative Quality Group (IQG)
  • Inside the mind of a young volunteer engaged in village education
  • Father Vallace, proud Gujarati, my professor of Calculus
  • Observations on a morning walk- 1
  • Observations on a morning walk- 2
  • Obama and 26th January
  • Kettle calling pot black
  • Delhi Election
  • Hindus at receiving end, again
  • Million Rupees coat!
  • Losing a loved one- de ja vu
  • Slip between a cup and lips

There may be some additional ones. I do not know how many of these I will be able to write. Perhaps I will just make blogs using bullet points only.

In the mean time, naturally I would like to speak with and meet as many of my friends , contacts and relatives as possible. I could be contacted at vicharak@gmail.com or 98791-93725.

It is nice to get back in touch with you!

Gaurang Vaishnav

CAUSE TO CELEBRATE- Swapan Dasgupta on Gujarat after 2002 in Telegraph

– Peace and prosperity after bloodshed in Gujarat

Swapan Dasgupta

(The Telegraph, Friday, March 2, 2012)

 

It may sound callous, but there was something patently disgusting about the way the media and activists colluded to turn a grim 10th anniversary of the 2002 Gujarat riots into a celebration of victimhood. From star anchors rushing to Ahmedabad to hug victims to the overuse of the photograph of the unfortunate Qutubuddin Ansari pleading for his life, every tear-jerking potential was cynically exploited. What should have been a solemn occasion of remembrance, perhaps leading to a pledge to make sectarian violence a thing of the past, was, instead, turned into an all-too-familiar Indian tamasha, culminating in riotous television discussions.

The reason for this ugly turn of events should be obvious. Ten years after the arson attack on the Sabarmati Express in Godhra became the trigger for murderous violence throughout Gujarat, the issue of ‘justice’ has been transformed into a political blame game. The activists who have doggedly kept the issue alive, despite the apparent lack of responsiveness in Gujarat, have shifted their priorities markedly. The issue is no longer one of securing the punishment of the rioters and those responsible for inhuman conduct, but the political targeting of one man: the chief minister, Narendra Modi.

The unspoken assumption is that justice will be served if Modi can be prosecuted for personally facilitating the carnage. As an additional bonus, the framing of charges against Modi is calculated to ensure his exclusion from the political arena and consequently bring to an abrupt end any possibility of him being in the reckoning for the prime minister’s post. In short, if you can’t beat him, disqualify him.

Had Modi shown himself to be electorally vulnerable, the need to fight him judicially would have evaporated. A Modi defeat in either 2002 or 2007 would have prompted the self-satisfied conclusion that “Gujarat has redeemed itself”— in the same way as, it is proclaimed, Uttar Pradesh redeemed itself by rejecting the Bharatiya Janata Party after the demolition of the Babri shrine in 1992. However, the prospects of the clutch of activists moving on to the next available cause have dimmed following the realization that not only has Modi strengthened himself politically but that the Congress in Gujarat lacks the necessary qualities to mount an effective challenge. Consequently, the only way they see to fight Modi is to remove him from politics altogether.

There is another factor at work. Over the past 10 years, Modi has transformed Gujarat spectacularly. After winning the 2002 assembly elections in a communally surcharged environment, he has deftly shifted the political focus of Gujarat from sectarian identity issues to rapid economic development. Gujarat was always an economically vibrant state and entrepreneurship is deeply ingrained in the DNA of the average Gujarati. Modi has played the role of a great facilitator by creating an environment that is conducive to the double digit growth of the state’s gross domestic product. He has toned up the administration, improved the finances of the state exchequer, brought down corruption markedly and made every rupee expended on government-run schemes a factor in economic value addition. Modi has been the model rightwing administrator pursuing the mantra of minimal but effective governance. His election victory in 2007 wasn’t a consequence of Hindu-Muslim polarization; it was based on his ability to deliver good governance.

Secondly, Modi successfully shifted tack from Hindu pride to Gujarati pride. This meant that hoary grievances centred on sectarian hurt were subsumed by a common desire to take advantage of the dividends flowing from a prolonged period of high economic growth. The popular mentality of Gujarat has undergone a discernible shift in the past decade. In the 30 years since the Ahmedabad riots of 1969, which left nearly 650 people dead in just five days of mayhem, Gujarat had become a riot-prone state.

With its sharp communal polarization, Ahmedabad epitomized that trend. After the 1969 flare-up, there were riots in 1971, 1972 and 1973. Then, after a period of lull, rioting resumed in January 1982, March 1984, March to July 1985, January 1986, March 1986, July 1986, January 1987, February 1987, November 1987, April 1990, October 1990, November 1990, December 1990, January 1991, March 1991, April 1991, January 1992, July 1992, December 1992 and January 1993. This chronology, assembled by the political scientist based in the United States of America, Ashutosh Varshney, in his Ethnic Conflict and Civil Life (2002) tells a story of unending curfews, social insecurity and escalating hatred affecting the two communities. It was a story replicated throughout Gujarat, including the otherwise integrated city of Surat that witnessed fierce riots in 1993.

Since March 2002, Gujarat has been riot-free. Curfews have become a thing of a distant past. What has occasioned this exemplary transformation? The facile explanation, often proffered unthinkingly by secularists anxious to find fault with Modi, is that Muslims have been too cowed down by the sheer intensity of the post-Godhra majoritarian backlash. Such an explanation presumes that riots are invariably begun by a section of the Muslim community — a problematic proposition and not always empirically sustainable.

More compelling is the explanation that factors in the larger administrative and economic changes in Gujarat over the past decade. First, both the civil administration and the political leadership have internalized the lessons from their inability to control mob violence in 2002. The police have been given a free hand to operate without the interference of small-time politicians attached to the ruling party. There has been a crackdown against the illicit liquor trade and the underworld that gained its muscle power from its proceeds. At the helm, there is an unspoken understanding that another riot, with its attendant TV coverage, would extract an unacceptably high political cost. That is why there is special attention paid to curbing Hindu extremism — a phenomenon that will affect Modi most adversely.

The biggest change has, however, been at the societal level. Gujarat today is a society that is obsessively preoccupied with making money and taking advantage of the economic opportunities that have presented themselves. With the end of boredom, a happy present and an appealing future, the belief that riots are bad for dhanda has seeped into society. This is not to suggest that the bitterness of the past has been replaced by idyllic bonhomie between communities. Far from it. Sectarian conflict persists in cities such as Ahmedabad, and less so in Surat. But there is a distinction that Varshney makes between sectarian conflict and sectarian violence. One need not necessarily lead to the other if contained within the parameters of economics and politics. The Muslims of Gujarat don’t possess the political clout they enjoyed earlier under Congress rule. But this has been compensated for by growing levels of prosperity. Those who argue that the economic development of Gujarat has bypassed Muslims should look at the economic empowerment of communities such as the Bohras, Khojas and Memons.

To many, Gujarat’s obsession with economic betterment may seem an expression of denial for the larger societal involvement in the 2002 riots. This may be partially true, since Gujarati Hindus view the post-Godhra troubles as something they don’t want to be reminded of incessantly — a point which the state Congress has grudgingly acknowledged. But it doesn’t distract from Modi’s undeniable success in changing the agenda dramatically in 10 years to the point where hardened Hindutvawadis now regard him as an enemy of the cause.

The riots of 2002 were horrible. But the important thing to note is that 10 years after the butchery, Gujarat is basking in peace and unprecedented prosperity. Now, that is something to celebrate.


Union Law Minister Salman Khursheed Offending Bharat

Union Law Minister Offending Bharat – Dr Pravin Togadia

VHP Press Release
Gwalior, February 10, 2012
In an election public meeting in Azamgad- Uttar Pradesh, the Union Minister of Law Salman Khursheed has crossed all limits in his constant endeavour to offend the majority of Bharat. Criticizing Salman Khursheed’s remarks about Batla House encounter, Dr Pravin Togadia, International Working President of VHP said, “Salman Khursheed claims that the encounter was fake, the govt was going to take action against it but kept quiet due to election & Sonia Gandhi’s eyes were full of tears seeing the photographs of the encounter etc. To win Azamgad seat & dreaming of winning Uttar Pradesh election to save Rahul Gandhi’s image, people like Salman Khursheed are going to the extent of offending Bharat, our brave Army & Police. The PM cries seeing pregnant wife of Dr Haneef who was caught by Australia, PM also cries & begs to Kuwait when a Muslim man is punished with removal of his eyes per their own law, now Khursheed claims that Sonia Gandhi cried seeing dead Jehadis in Batla House encounter! Tears of the Govt representatives flow freely only for Muslims & never for Sanaatani Hindus, Sikhs, Jains, Buddhists, Tribals, OBCs, SCs & others! Neither PM, nor Soniaji nor Salman Khursheed or anyone ever cried for the thousands of army men & police killed at the hands of Jehadis in Kashmir, Assam, Mumbai, Delhi or at the hands of Naxals!
Now the time has come for all patriotic & truly nationalist citizens of Bharat to democratically stand up against such anti-national remarks & actions – be it elections or by democratic agitations. The same Salman Khursheed – Bharat’s sitting Law minister promised in his wife’s election campaign 9% snatching from OBC quota for Muslims & now like a serial offender he again insults Bharat & the late police officer who was rewarded for his bravery in Batla house for the same encounter. If Salman Khursheed, as a Law Minister is against his own Govt’s decision that the Batla House encounter was a brave deed by the police, then he has no right to be in the govt neither as a Law Minister nor even as an M.P. of Bharat. Those who have any sympathy towards Jehadis have no place in the democracy. Thousands of innocent Indians were brutally killed & maimed by Jehadi attacks from Delhi to Mumbai & Bengaluru to many places. But neither Salman Khursheed nor his superiors shown any sympathy for the victims, instead, they are siding with the Jehadis! After a conspiracy to snatch all castes’ Hindus’ Roti, Education, Employment, Bank Loans to be given to Muslims, now the govt is systematically moving towards persecuting majority of Bharat to appease Muslims. Muslim League did the same at the independence time & Bharat was forced into partition. Now this entire ‘I am with Jehadis; NOT with Bharat’ gang is breaking Bharat again. VHP condemns all these efforts & appeals all to protest against this behaviour democratically

For information, contact: drtogadia@gmail.com ; 098253 23406

Hindu, Muslim and Sikh leaders to attend Vatican peace meet

So Hindus (and Sikhs, Jains and Buddhists) are still gullible. They consider it a privilege and status symbol to be invited by the Pope. This is akin to a lion (actually a cunning fox in this case) inviting a lamb for the dinner where the lamb  does not know that it is the main course!

Remember the Pancatantra story of the monkey who was being lured by the crocodile to satisfy his wife’s craving for a monkey liver? of course, he was smarter than current crop of Hindu leaders.

I would love to see names of these Hindu “leaders” so that we can expose and shame them.

Oct 18, 2011

London: Over 200 spiritual leaders, including Hindus, Muslims, Jains, Sikhs and Buddhists, will attend a multi-faith meeting being hosted by Pope Benedict XVI on 27 October in Vatican to promote world peace.

Pope Benedict XVI is hosting the multi-faith meeting in favour of world peace, which was started by his predecessor Pope John Paul II, the Vatican said in a statement today. The spiritual leaders invited are from Hindus, Buddhists, Muslims, Sikhs, Confucianists, Baha’i, Jains, Jews, Taoists and Zoroastrians, it said.

The meeting would call for “a common path” to peace. Reuters

Among the Hindu invitees are Mahatma Gandhi’s grandson Rajmohan Gandhi, who has already participated in an earlier meeting. Three Jains, five Sikhs and 67 Buddhists leaders are in the list of invitees.

Around 70 Muslim leaders, including from Iran and Saudi Arabia, will also be present on the occasion, said Cardinal Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson, chief of the Vatican’s Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace.

The meeting would call for “a common path” to peace, he said, adding the participants will pray in silence during a short procession to the basilica of Assisi and in separate rooms after the ceremony. However, the Grand Imam of the Egypt-based influential Al-Azhar mosque has called for a boycott of the conference since the pope expressed solidarity with Egyptian Copts following a New Year’s bomb attack on them.

The event will also mark the 25th anniversary of the historic multi-faith meeting held in Assisi on 27 October 1986 by Pope John Paul II.

PTI

http://www.firstpost.com/fwire/hindu-muslim-and-sikh-leaders-to-attend-vatican-peace-meet-111038.html

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